Having INSANE trouble getting a new tyre on the rim...!!!!!

Bhima
Bhima Posts: 2,145
edited May 2009 in Workshop
Got given some 20mm tyres for my road bike and spent about 90 minutes getting the rear one on - when I finally got it on using spoons I couldn't pump it up because i'd punctured it in the process. Great. :|

Couldn't get the tyre back off to fix it. :?

So I took everything down the local bike shop and they managed to do it. I don't know how, but they didn't use any tyre levers at all - just thier hands. :shock:!!!!!

They are quite puncture-resistant so I don't think they'll be coming off anytime soon...

If I do get a puncture though, are there any tips you can give me to get the things off and on again? I snapped a plastic tyre lever trying to get them on and don't want to have to go through all that again. :|

Is it best to work your way around the rim, for example, or try to get it on the rim from oppostite ends...? Or is there a better way?

The tyres are super-hard - will they stretch over time and come off easier in future?

I shouldn't complain really, as they were free :) but now i'm super-paranoid as soon as the road starts to get just the slightest bit rough... :?

Comments

  • Giant Phil
    Giant Phil Posts: 116
    Had a spoke replaced at the local bike shop, and watched in amazment as this bloke took off my kevlar tyres with his hands!!!

    A method I use which seems to work well. With the wheel off the bike, with your foot (without shoe just to be safe) keep the rim pressed against the floor standing upright. At the same time, us both hands, and started at the bottom of the tyre (closest to floor) pull the tyre upwards to build up slack at the top. If you work your way up to the top, gripping the tyre tightly, as you go up, you should have enough slack tyre at the top to pull it off without levers, or at least get a tyre lever under it.

    Hope you understand, tis abit confuzzling, but hope it helps

    Phil
    Giant SCR, BRIGHT Orange.
  • a_n_t
    a_n_t Posts: 2,011
    hand_exerciser_hand-grip.jpg

    8)
    Manchester wheelers

    PB's
    10m 20:21 2014
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  • gabriel959
    gabriel959 Posts: 4,227
    I had some problems last night putting some krylions on ksyrium equipes but thanks to some patience, loads of blisters and tyre levers they are now on!!!
    x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x
    Commuting / Winter rides - Jamis Renegade Expert
    Pootling / Offroad - All-City Macho Man Disc
    Fast rides Cannondale SuperSix Ultegra
  • Frank the tank
    Frank the tank Posts: 6,553
    Whenever I sruggle to get a wheel on a rim in the comfort of my garage there is always the little niggle at the back of my mind of how I'd cope if it was a cold wet night and fumbling around with cold fingers. :cry:

    Particularly on my winter bike, I stick to combo's I know are no trouble for the above reason. :D
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • synchronicity
    synchronicity Posts: 1,415
    Bhima wrote:
    Is it best to work your way around the rim, for example, or try to get it on the rim from oppostite ends...?

    Definitely the former not the latter. And make sure the tube only just has enough air in it to maintain its shape. :wink:

    You mount one side of the tyre completely first, then stick the tube in, make sure that it [the inner tube] is seated fully in the rim bed to avoid plinch flats, then fit the other sidewall (starting from one side and working your way around). Don't try to mount both sidewalls at the same time.

    It also helps to pull/stretch the tyre up to the point where you have to get the last bit on. Don't just fit the tyre bead on loosely in the first place and expect the last bit to be easy.
  • I can do most tyres without resorting to levers.

    Getting the first side on is usually easy enough, it's the second that gives you trouble.

    Stand up, with the wheel on the floor, valve hole down. Get the bead on from the top, making sure it sits in the middle of the rim (over the spoke holes).

    Grip the tyre tightly with both hands, at the top of the tyre, and gradually move your hands apart, using your body weight to stretch the tyre around the rim. By the time you get to the bottom you should be able to flip the last part over the rim by hand, or easily with a lever.

    If it doesn't work first time do it again, trying to let as little tension off the tyre as possible as you move back to the top.

    Hope this makes sense, it does work...
  • itboffin
    itboffin Posts: 20,062
    Have you've tried swearing, throwing then crying ... :shock:
    Rule #5 // Harden The Feck Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I just use tyre levers at the end, I know I bring with it the risk of breaking the inner tube but oh well I have plenty now!! :lol:
  • markos1963
    markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    I find that if you grab the whole tyre and try to work both beads over the rim you can get the tyre off without levers. You don't say what wheels you've got but I have heard of problems with Campag wheels being a bit stubborn regarding tyre fitting.
  • LazyBoycp
    LazyBoycp Posts: 320
    I feel your pain! A couple of weeks ago I got a Conti Hometrainer tyre to use on my trainer (surprisingly enough). Took me ages to fit it and, when I pumped it up the inner tube exploded (almost bowel-looseningly loudly!) and knocked the tyre off the rim. Had quite a bit of trouble removing the tyre, and then even more trouble getting it back on. Did it all with my hands though - tried with levers but they seemed to be no help at all.

    Quite tempted to buy myself a new rear wheel just so I don't need to change the tyre when I want to use that bike out on the road! :shock: :D
  • dilemna
    dilemna Posts: 2,187
    No don't use levers just hands. If you have a really tight tyre use a smear of washing up liquid on the beading to help slide it on.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • Bhima
    Bhima Posts: 2,145
    a_n_t wrote:
    hand_exerciser_hand-grip.jpg

    8)
    :lol: Good call!

    Anyway, these tyres are indestructable! :shock: Only lost 3psi since they've been on and not one dent/cut at all!

    They guys at the LBS got the tyre into the deeper part of the rim in the centre to get that little bit extra slack... Going to have to practice this technique with my spare wheels/old tyres.

    Does anyone know if they will somehow "stretch" by being pumped up though? On my old bike, I remember that the tyres got easier to take off after a few weeks of riding on them...
  • No doubt I'm teaching you to suck eggs, but have you let every last bit of air out the tube? I always pump a bit in to give the tube some shape and make it easier to get into the tyre (doesn't everyone?). If you don't then let it all out before you do the last bit of the tyre it can be almost impossible to get it on.

    Another tip is to get a mountain bike with tubeless UST wheels. As you're not supposed to use levers at all (in case you damage the rim profile) you get very good at putting on f'ing tight tires using only your hands :wink:

    And they do loosen up with use, making them easier to get on and off as time goes by.
    It doesn't get any easier, but I don't appear to be getting any faster.
  • COVEC
    COVEC Posts: 213
    It's so easy even girls can do it, have a look at the link below


    GIRLY RACE TEAM
  • If they are tight, then the best thing to do is stand on one part of the tire, and the pull up on the other side - hard! effectively stretching it a tiny bit.
  • Takis61
    Takis61 Posts: 239
    Saw the post ref. washing up liquid, I read a post yonks ago that recommended talcum powder - tried it myself (I have small, girly weak hands) & it does make a big difference.
    Not much good when you puncture on a ride though !
    My knees hurt !
  • peanut1978
    peanut1978 Posts: 1,031
    Workshop levers

    do the trick every time
  • 4kicks
    4kicks Posts: 549
    Takis61 wrote:
    Saw the post ref. washing up liquid, I read a post yonks ago that recommended talcum powder - tried it myself (I have small, girly weak hands) & it does make a big difference.
    Not much good when you puncture on a ride though !

    Actually I keep the spare tubes in a very small ziplock bag in the saddle bag, with wee bit of talcum powder in it. When I flat, after removing the old tube I dust the talc round the tyre and volia! Dont need levers, even fitting Contis & Pro Races onto Campag Eurus rims. Mind you, I dont go out much when its raining, not sure what talc does when everythign is wet as hell..
    Fitter....healthier....more productive.....
  • Bhima
    Bhima Posts: 2,145
    Would talc not increase the chances of a puncture if it got inside the tyre? It would only be a small risk, bit i've had punctures from extremely small things before - I sometimes hoover out my tyres to get rid of every last atom of dust!
  • rockmount
    rockmount Posts: 761
    Bhima wrote:
    - I sometimes hoover out my tyres to get rid of every last atom of dust!
    I find the electrons particularly tricky :wink:
    .. who said that, internet forum people ?
  • 4kicks
    4kicks Posts: 549
    Go into your local fetish ruber shop and ask for the extra fine talcum power. Smooth
    Fitter....healthier....more productive.....
  • Chaz.Harding
    Chaz.Harding Posts: 3,144
    Just ordinary talc would be fine!! It's only a bloody tyre!

    Can't say I bother with it anymore. Just fit and forget... :wink:
    Boo-yah mofo
    Sick to the power of rad
    Fix it 'till it's broke
  • markwalker
    markwalker Posts: 953
    Bhima wrote:
    Would talc not increase the chances of a puncture if it got inside the tyre? It would only be a small risk, bit i've had punctures from extremely small things before - I sometimes hoover out my tyres to get rid of every last atom of dust!


    rofl :lol:
  • DaSy
    DaSy Posts: 599
    I'm not sure what talc is like where you come from Bhima, but it is the stuff you rub into babies arses round here, it's not like broken glass.
    Complicating matters since 1965
  • Chaz.Harding
    Chaz.Harding Posts: 3,144
    DaSy

    Your telling me my talc ISN'T meant to be like broken glass...

    Uh oh...

    My poor baby...

    :lol::lol:




    (Yes, I am joking!!)
    Boo-yah mofo
    Sick to the power of rad
    Fix it 'till it's broke
  • Hugh A
    Hugh A Posts: 1,189
    If you can be bothered, it is well worth talcing around the inside of new tyres when you fit them. Make sure you go all round rubbing it into the beads too as this makes it easier to fit the tyre.

    The other good thing abou this is that it stays in the tyre and makes it easier when you are out on the road and the p*ture fairy visits. It also prevents the tube from sticking to the tyre (which not only makes it difficult to get the old one out, but I think tends to increase the number of p*nctures).

    Tyres nearly always stretch a bit after being well inflated for a few days and the first time you fit them is usually the worst.

    Getting them right into the deepest part of the well where the diameter is smallest is the trick for mounting with hands only. If they don't go first time keep working the tyre round from both sides towards the last part. This helps the beads to creep along the rim tape slightly.
    I\'m sure I had one of those here somewhere
  • andrewgturnbull
    andrewgturnbull Posts: 3,861
    Hi Bhima.

    Unless you're using deep aero wheels then 20mm tyres are probably not the best choice. The same model of tyres in a 23mm or 25mm width will roll faster and give you a little more flex to help you get them on and off.

    Cheers, Andy
  • andrewgturnbull
    andrewgturnbull Posts: 3,861
    COVEC wrote:
    It's so easy even girls can do it, have a look at the link below


    GIRLY RACE TEAM

    Hi again.

    Excellent link.

    The only thing I'd add is to check all round the rim to make sure no part of the tube is caught under the bead before inflating.

    Cheers, Andy
  • Lagavulin
    Lagavulin Posts: 1,688
    I was so impressed with the ride quality of Vittoria Open Pave Evo-CGs - which slipped on to my Racing 3s - I bought some more. Spent virtually the whole of the Spanish F1 qualifying coverage trying to fit them to a DT RR1.2 rim before giving up. I could barely fit one side of the tyre bead to the rim. Tried two tyres but this tyre + rim combo surpasses my previous "most difficult" combination and even accounted for a Soma steel-cored tyre lever.

    Can't believe they're the same tyres I fitted to the Racing 3s. Tempted to remove one of those and try fitting one of the orginals to the DT Swiss rim and see if that is as difficult.