Do you use clip in pedals or pedal straps?

redrabbit
redrabbit Posts: 93
edited March 2009 in MTB general
I'm about to get a mountain bike, probably my first ever good on as I've had very cheap ones in the past.

I alwas used to use a strap where you put your foot in a cage thing around the pedal to stop it slipping off. I was wondering though if anyone of you use clip in pedals?

I'll be cycling 4 miles to the train station and back 4 days a week for work. As well as leisurely cycling on some roads, and around lakes and things. Just wondering if it's worth considering or if I'm getting ahead of myself.

Comments

  • Daz555
    Daz555 Posts: 3,976
    Does anyone still use straps?
    You only need two tools: WD40 and Duck Tape.
    If it doesn't move and should, use the WD40.
    If it shouldn't move and does, use the tape.
  • Enwezor
    Enwezor Posts: 124
    I did a duathlon race on my then new rockhopper 6 years ago.
    On the first lap I broke both straps on the pedals as I tried to climb some hills - they were a nightmare and then they flapped about the whole race.
    I guess they are fine for normal riding but they scare the pants off me - if you want to be locked into the bike, use clip-in pedals then at least you can take your feet out when you want with a simple twist of your foot.
    £30 for M520s and £40 upwards for the shoes......
  • Furbes
    Furbes Posts: 289
    I use neither , Ill always swear by my DMR V12's :D
  • Merlin do a deal for M520's @ £15 if you buy them with a pair of shoes - excellent entry price:

    http://www.merlincycles.co.uk/?fn=produ ... goryId=136
  • Belv
    Belv Posts: 866
    I use straps and have no problems with them. Don't tighten them so much that you can't slide your foot out if you need to. You still learn to pull up on the pedals as i discovered when i switched to flats last winter and my foot kept lifting off the pedal.
  • redrabbit
    redrabbit Posts: 93
    I don't really understand how you cycle effeciently without using straps or clip ins.

    In my EXTREMELY limited experience my foot kept slipping off the pedal, and you can't really get a good grip on it. Plus you can't pull upwards on the pedal either.
  • redrabbit
    redrabbit Posts: 93
    BobbyTrigger - the only problem with clipin pedals like that is, you have to use clip-in shoes too, e.g. you can't just jump on in regular trainers can you?

    I think I seen some other pedals which looked like normal flat ones, but had the clip bit as an option.


    I guess you can change the pedals around in seconds though, just by unscrewing one set for another - right?
  • llamafarmer
    llamafarmer Posts: 1,893
    redrabbit wrote:
    BobbyTrigger - the only problem with clipin pedals like that is, you have to use clip-in shoes too, e.g. you can't just jump on in regular trainers can you?

    I think I seen some other pedals which looked like normal flat ones, but had the clip bit as an option.


    I guess you can change the pedals around in seconds though, just by unscrewing one set for another - right?

    Shimano do a single sided SPD, with a normal pedal one side and an SPD on the other


    http://www.merlincycles.co.uk/?fn=product&productId=756&categoryId=81

    It's not great and I got rid of mine eventually in favour of proper two sided 'clipless' (this is the generic name for SPD stye pedals - SPD being a Shimano brand name) pedals because I found it hard to find the SPD side on the trails.

    They might suit you though as you probably won't be clipping out as much on the sort of terrain you're looking at riding. Along with a shoe like this:

    http://www.merlincycles.co.uk/?fn=product&productId=1629&categoryId=136
  • redrabbit
    redrabbit Posts: 93
    Thanks.

    Are the pedals easily interchangable?

    E.g. would it take a few minutes to just unscrew one set and put the others in?

    I will use clipped most days, but on others I would like the option as I don't know what my plans are really, I haven't really thought about where I will cycle when not going to/from work.
  • Raymondavalon
    Raymondavalon Posts: 5,346
    Pedals are a 5 minute job if you have the right tools, as in a pedal spanner. don't forget to put a little anti seize compound (like Copperslip or a tiny coat of grease) on the threads to enable easy removal.

    The primary advantage of "clip in" or SPD pedlas is you get power to the cranks on the upstroke of your leg too and it does make a difference.

    As for me, due to my lower leg injury I will only use platform or flat pedals like the DMR V8 and Kona J@cksh!t pedals fitted to my bikes. I just don't quite trust an SPD pedal/shoe combo at this time.
  • Northwind
    Northwind Posts: 14,675
    redrabbit wrote:
    In my EXTREMELY limited experience my foot kept slipping off the pedal, and you can't really get a good grip on it. Plus you can't pull upwards on the pedal either.

    If you were on OEM pedals, chances are they were total rubbish- smooth, slidy tops. Proper pedals have grippy surfaces, most folks riding mtbs with flat pedals will use a spike pedal like a DMR V8. No shortage of grip at all. A lot of folks swear by grippy shoes like Five Tens but IMO that's overkill, good pedals give good grip with any decent flat shoe. I've got a pair of Five Tens I never wear, and a pair of old Vans that are comfier and better made, and still give me more than enough grip.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • dave_hill
    dave_hill Posts: 3,877
    Northwind wrote:
    Proper pedals have grippy surfaces, most folks riding mtbs with flat pedals will use a spike pedal like a DMR V8. No shortage of grip at all.

    You still can't pull up them though. Despite using both SPDs and flats depending on which bike I'm using and the type of riding I'm doing, pedalling clipped in is far more efficient. The other plus of being clipped in is that you ALWAYS get your foot in excatly the same position every time.
    Northwind wrote:
    A lot of folks swear by grippy shoes like Five Tens but IMO that's overkill
    .

    The good thing about the sticky shoes for freeride and DH though is that your feet are less likely to get bounced off the pedals when the going gets squirrelly - I have a pair of resoled Airwalks with sticky rubber and a pair of Nike 6.0 Mogans without - the Airwalks win every time (plus they're stiffer too).
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  • I use strapless clips which give me the best of both worlds:
    you have the advantage of the clip for the uphills, do not need special cleats/shoes and when you need to dab a foot down quickly you can just stick your leg out sideways without having to remember to pull your foot out of the cage first.
  • Northwind
    Northwind Posts: 14,675
    dave_hill wrote:
    You still can't pull up them though..

    Yup. But you have to make your own conclusions on how big a deal that is, since testing's often not shown this to be the advantage that it seems.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • dave_hill
    dave_hill Posts: 3,877
    Northwind wrote:
    Testing's often not shown this to be the advantage that it seems.

    Really?

    As Vic Reeves once said, 75% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
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  • Northwind
    Northwind Posts: 14,675
    If you look around at the few tests that have been done under measured conditions, you find a few recurring themes... When pulling up, it's commonly stated that the actual lift is minimal, and also the downstroke tends to be weakened. Are these studies right? That's the tricky bit. Ii have no idea, personally, so I just try to keep an open mind- though I'm not allowed to wear clipless anyway, it makes no real odds to me but when you see the wild variation in claims for performance, you've got to think that a lot of them are wrong.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • dave_hill
    dave_hill Posts: 3,877
    Personally, I find it it a lot easier if I make a conscious (sp?) effort to pull and push on each stroke, and I also flex my ankles properly.

    If you watch roadies on say the Tour de France and watch their pedalling action - then tell me that they're not making much use of the upstroke.

    I have no doubt that the push down on the pedals transfers most energy into propelling the bike forward, but if you use some of the upstroke too then it surely increases efficiency - which can only be a good thing.
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  • Northwind
    Northwind Posts: 14,675
    I think what professionals do on the road doesn't neccesarily have much to do with how we ride on trails, though... Even if they do get big benefits from it, with the enormous amounts of practice and training they put in, doesn't mean it transfers to joe public.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • Soggz
    Soggz Posts: 221
    Straps...always.
  • dave_hill
    dave_hill Posts: 3,877
    Northwind wrote:
    Even if they do get big benefits from it, with the enormous amounts of practice and training they put in, doesn't mean it transfers to joe public.

    You can always learn from it though and adapt to our situation. I play football too - I'll never be a Ronaldo, or a Gerrard, but I can still aspire and try to emulate.

    By my own admission I'm not a great climber, I'm definitely a gravity pilot. I need all the help and efficiency I can get to go uphill!!

    Like anything else, I think if you close your mind to a certain idea without giving it a bit of thought or even trying it out, it isn't really possible to speak from a position of experience or authority.

    In some cases I think that we're all guilty of regurgitating what the ad-men and marketing departments tell us, as our own opinion. But from personal experience I find that smooth, deliberate pedal stroke with as much emphasis on the upstroke as the down works wonders for me. And it probably exercises some muscles that wouldn't normally get exercised!!
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  • Northwind
    Northwind Posts: 14,675
    dave_hill wrote:
    And it probably exercises some muscles that wouldn't normally get exercised!!

    I'd be more impressed if it exercised less, I ride for the fun despite the exercise :lol: But yep, I agree with what you're saying, mostly. I suspect I'd gravitate towards spds if I could use them, just to make the climbs easier.
    Uncompromising extremist