security for your bike, what have you got?

blablablacksheep
blablablacksheep Posts: 1,377
edited March 2009 in MTB general
I going to be getting my new bike soon and when it arrives the first thing i going to do is phone local police and ask what sort of tags or things i can do to secure my bike.

i wondering what sort of things do you use to secure your bike.

of course there are locks but i mean now-a-days you more likely i would thing of being mugged for your bike rather than being nicked when locked.

so with this in mind what sort of security would you advise and should be a must?

i know there is this site which the london polic recommend,

http://www.immobilise.com/index.php

i thinking of getting one of these, anyone got one?
https://www.immobilise.com/view.php?sta ... &product=2

be interesting to see what sort of things you guys use .
London2Brighton Challange 100k!
http://www.justgiving.com/broxbourne-runners
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Comments

  • I'm very much interested in getting a system such as this for my own bike. Going to see what the shop says once they get the models in that I wanna try.
    Start Weight 18st 13lbs March 2009
    17st 10lbs August 2009
    17st 4lbs October 2009
    15st 12lbs December 2010

    Final planned weight 12st 7lbs
  • from what i've herd, the immobilise thing is a good idea, but its not that straight forward.

    People have bought them, but not all the police have the correct scanners to find them.

    I got a big hefty lock, 2 cable loops and another crappy lock as a deterrant. However i'll never be leaving my bike anywhere unattended. If someone wants your bike, they'll have it.

    Just get a decent insurance policy and the correct lock to make sure your covered. Probably the best way to ensure that if it does go bye bye, you'l be able to get something back.
  • weeksy59
    weeksy59 Posts: 2,606
    Not enough it would seem. :oops:
  • Just get a decent insurance policy

    for example this seems good idea but for bikes under 1000 pound it kinda pointless to get a insurance for them sinse the cost it stupidly high compared to the price of the bike.

    most house policy i belive cover break ins ect but not being mugged in street, and the ones that do as i said are costly and i wouldnt get one unless i had a 1000+ bike and could afford the premuim.

    this why i think these tags are good ideas for the under 1k bikes, scanner wise i belive all scanners are the same as when i asked guy in local police station he said they all are, thus it good idea to have a tag inside the bike as will help recover your bike a lot faster.

    i going to local police hq once i get bike to be tagged and marked:) at least it will deter people, and im 6ft+ tall so hopefully that another deterrant:P
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
    http://www.justgiving.com/broxbourne-runners
  • P-Jay
    P-Jay Posts: 1,478
    TBH aside from a massive lock on the garage, a poo little batery powered IR alarm and a motorbike chain attached to a fixed ground achor, nothing. Oh and a unlocked scooter in the garage with the keys in, a designated decoy because scrotes love a scooter.

    I don't really tend to ride anywhere where you see anyone but other riders and the occational walker, but if someone did try to mug me for my bike, they'd have the battle of their lives on their hands, in fact they would be literally fighting for their lives.

    Some people will say that no material items are worth dying for, but I'd be damned if I'm going to take it lying down.
  • supersonic
    supersonic Posts: 82,708
    Another useful marker, should bits ever be recovered, is to print your house number and post code (or some other identifier), in small font, laminate, cut out and put into your components ie the tyres, under the saddle, up the seatpost, BB shell etc etc.

    I use a bloody big piece of chain and a hefty padlock - got from Barnetts.
  • Kiblams
    Kiblams Posts: 2,423
    This probably isn't a good idea; but has anyone ever used a bit of old bike chain? As I carry around a chain splitter with me anyway so it could act as an extra deterrant if used with a D-lock or cable lock.

    Does anyone know if bike chains stand up to being bent sideways? If they do I may have to add one to my current bike security

    Just a thought...
  • make sure you have a good set of dated pictures to document your bike and any changes you've made. Also keep all your receipts for the bike and parts etc.

    BTW, £55 a year or £5 a month to insure a £500 bike with CycleGuard (not saying they're the best, but surely thats not extortionate!)

    Do cycle insurance policies/house policies with bike cover cover muggings?
  • P-Jay
    P-Jay Posts: 1,478
    Speaking of which, a pal of mine was in the LBS the other day being told by the manager that he's knows of a big increase in bike thefts (from the number of people coming in for copies of proof of payment and cheques from insurance companies I guess). Lots of people being followed home when they've got bikes on the roof of thier car etc.

    If you're leaving a well known area for riding, trail centre etc, well worth keeping an eye on who's behind you, if they're still there when you're nearly home.....
  • Ive been looking at getting one of those Kryptonite New York locks, just trying to work out if they're worth the money or not tho. I have no problem spending £70 on a lock if its actually worth the money, its just if it isnt...
  • get an onguard lock. Gold standard according to insurance companies and a good £30 cheaper.
  • Daz555
    Daz555 Posts: 3,976
    Its insured (cost about £2.50 a month extra on my house insurance).
    Its locked to my motorcycle which is locked to the floor of my garage.

    I've had two motorcycles nicked over the years and they were both locked to a lamp post with £100 worth of chain and £50 worth of padlock. I'm really not interested in getting worried about securing this stuff anymore. If they want it, they'll have it.

    Classic problem with high spec bikes is that super light hyper-alloy, multi-butted frames are so easy to cut. If a bike is chock full of high spec parts and has 100 notes of chain holding it to a wall, the thief will happily just chop though the frame instead.

    Best defence is simply to keep it out of sight.
    You only need two tools: WD40 and Duck Tape.
    If it doesn't move and should, use the WD40.
    If it shouldn't move and does, use the tape.
  • scottyjohn
    scottyjohn Posts: 143
    I had my bike stolen before new year only to have it returned to me by a vigilante LBS worker who saw my post in the stolen section of the forum.
    For my commuter bike, I still have it in the underground garage, but I went to a local chain dealers who do chains for tying up ships etc :D H sold me 4ft of 18mm hardened security chain for £20!!!. Guy took me in the yard and showed me what it took to cut it, I am 18 st and with all my weight I couldnt cut the thing with bolt cutters. The only way to get through it would be with a specialist grinder or a cutting torch. I then bought a kryptonite New York D-Lock to use as the padlock and the scroats havent had any joy with it yet :D
    The D-Lock looks good enough to me, and its still portable enough to take in the back pack if out and about.
  • scottyjohn
    scottyjohn Posts: 143
    Oh and my MTB comes into the flat and now lives on the balcony under a £14.99 cover bought from Argos
  • supersonic
    supersonic Posts: 82,708
    scottyjohn wrote:
    I had my bike stolen before new year only to have it returned to me by a vigilante LBS worker who saw my post in the stolen section of the forum.
    For my commuter bike, I still have it in the underground garage, but I went to a local chain dealers who do chains for tying up ships etc :D H sold me 4ft of 18mm hardened security chain for £20!!!. Guy took me in the yard and showed me what it took to cut it, I am 18 st and with all my weight I couldnt cut the thing with bolt cutters. The only way to get through it would be with a specialist grinder or a cutting torch. I then bought a kryptonite New York D-Lock to use as the padlock and the scroats havent had any joy with it yet :D
    The D-Lock looks good enough to me, and its still portable enough to take in the back pack if out and about.

    Superb, similar to what I got! Really isn't worth paying for these stupid expensive chain locks.
  • my MTB stays in my bedroom with a 12 bore shot gun in easy reach
    I assume this is French petrol - be careful in reverse - the car will retreat rapidly at the least provocation.
  • dav1
    dav1 Posts: 1,298
    I keep my bike indoors when at home, and use my hack to get about on.

    When I do leave my MTB its locked with a hefty D lock, an extra cable and anything that isn't tied down is taken off the bike and goes inside with me (Usually seat and front wheel + lights if I need them).
    Giant TCR advanced 2 (Summer/race)
    Merlin single malt fixie (Commuter/winter/training)
    Trek superfly 7 (Summer XC)
    Giant Yukon singlespeed conversion (winter MTB/Ice/snow)

    Carrera virtuoso - RIP
  • llamafarmer
    llamafarmer Posts: 1,893
    scottyjohn wrote:
    For my commuter bike, I still have it in the underground garage, but I went to a local chain dealers who do chains for tying up ships etc :D H sold me 4ft of 18mm hardened security chain for £20!!!. Guy took me in the yard and showed me what it took to cut it, I am 18 st and with all my weight I couldnt cut the thing with bolt cutters. The only way to get through it would be with a specialist grinder or a cutting torch.

    Awesome! As long as you have a lock to match! They'll always target the weakest link, which as daz says, could even be your frame :(

    Thieving scum!
  • Northwind
    Northwind Posts: 14,675
    In the garage, mine is mainly protected by being parked behind a far more expensive motorbike :lol: The mtb's never out of my sight if I'm out and about, and the road bike's too cheap to be worth seriously securing so it gets a barely-worth-bothering kryptonite cable lock as a basic deterrant to put off amateurs, pros wouldn't bother with it given the company it keeps at work. If I needed something more effective, it'd be a Kryptonite New York u-lock, they're very strong, and convenient to use. I hate carrying around cable locks, they never coil up right and the only ones that offer any real protection are so cumbersome and heavy that they're more hassle than a U.
    scottyjohn wrote:
    The only way to get through it would be with a specialist grinder or a cutting torch.

    Hydraulic cutters would do it too... Though I've never heard of portable hydraulics being used for pushbike thefts, just motorbikes. Though according to the Met the same gangs target both now :(

    What you might find is that it's relatively brittle... Hardened chains tend to be, which can make them more vulnerable to brute force attack, expansion with a spreader tool or just being smashed with a sledgehammer. But 18mm, that's a monster chain, even if it's seriously overhardened it's not going to be easy to break. Good choice! Though not very portable :lol:

    Daz, sad to say it but that probably reflects more on the chains you used, an awful lot of expensive locks are very poor. Price is no gauge of safety, neither is insurance approval or Sold Secure/Thatcham- Sold Secure were still accrediting locks with the terrible round-key locks as "gold" long after the pen-picking technique was public. I had the opportunity at a bike show to crop an Oxford Monster "Sold Secure Gold" chain, I'm absolutely puny and it still only took me about a minute. There are locks out there that really are a serious deterrant, something like Scottyjohn's chain, or an Almax or Squire or English Chain Co 16mm chain, all immune to manual croppers. Proper heavyweight security those.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • dav1
    dav1 Posts: 1,298
    I was hit by the sold secure vs price when buying. My insurance insists on a silver grade lock for my bike yet this was more £20 then the abus lock that's higher in their own security rating (and looked stronger) as my LBS offerd me a big discount on that model. I phoned my insurer and they said "this lock will invalidate your insurance".
    Giant TCR advanced 2 (Summer/race)
    Merlin single malt fixie (Commuter/winter/training)
    Trek superfly 7 (Summer XC)
    Giant Yukon singlespeed conversion (winter MTB/Ice/snow)

    Carrera virtuoso - RIP
  • pilsburypie
    pilsburypie Posts: 891
    I don't have a portable lock as I never leave my bike unattended out and about.

    At home, I have a fairly standard lock on my garage, a wall anchor and a medium thick long cable locking the bikes together.

    My thoughts are that this is enough to stop an opportunist, but if someone has come prepared the would get through most things in the quiet seclusion of my garage. I have turned my efforts to insurance. My household covers each bike upto £1500 with no extra charge as long as I make reasonable efforts to secure them...... which I have.....

    Sad state of affairs, but even an unbreakable lock won't save your baby..... read a post not to long back where someones bike was attempted to be stolen and the theives knackered the frame trying to twist it round to snap the lock. They didn't get the bike, but it was shagged beyond repair......

    Insurance my friends, a lot of insurance..... :wink:
  • llamafarmer
    llamafarmer Posts: 1,893
    My household covers each bike upto £1500 with no extra charge as long as I make reasonable efforts to secure them......

    How deliciously vague.... :?
  • My household covers each bike upto £1500 with no extra charge as long as I make reasonable efforts to secure them......

    though does it cover thief ? or outside your home ie if you get mugged?

    i think most insurance companys cover bikes inside the house but if they are nicked they tend to not cover them or nicked outside the home.

    i going to get a electric tag for my bike and a marker from the local police( UV stamped with my name address and contact number ".

    then il stick a thief sticker on bike as a deterrant that about it really, sinse i dont need a lock as when i ride i keep on my bike and when i stop i at home lol, and my house secure:)
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
    http://www.justgiving.com/broxbourne-runners
  • pilsburypie
    pilsburypie Posts: 891
    It covers bikes in the home, out the home, anywhere in the world, being stored, transported etc. Even covers accidental damage as I found out when I drove my lefty cannondale into a carpark height restricted barrier on roof mounted bars! Bent the frame and wheels, a quick phone call and a cheque for £1400 (£1500 minus my £100 excess) came through the post a week later. Didn't even ask to see the damaged bike.....
  • Cheshley
    Cheshley Posts: 1,448
    My household covers each bike upto £1500 with no extra charge as long as I make reasonable efforts to secure them......

    though does it cover thief ? or outside your home ie if you get mugged?

    i think most insurance companys cover bikes inside the house but if they are nicked they tend to not cover them or nicked outside the home.

    i going to get a electric tag for my bike and a marker from the local police( UV stamped with my name address and contact number ".

    then il stick a thief sticker on bike as a deterrant that about it really, sinse i dont need a lock as when i ride i keep on my bike and when i stop i at home lol, and my house secure:)

    What's this marker you get from the local police? My local PCSO knew nothing about it when I asked her. My rides are all data tagged and therefore registered on a national database but visible marking and local registration would just be an additional deterrent. Bikes are covered on the house insurance and they have pictures of them along with a list of upgrades and a letter from my LBS stating how much it would cost to replace them in their current condition.
    1998 Marin Hawk Hill
    2008 Specialized FSR XC Comp
    2008 Scott Speedster S30 FB

    SLOW RIDES FOR UNFIT PEOPLE - Find us on Facebook or in the MTB Rides section of this forum.
  • ride_whenever
    ride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    pislburypie, who do you have your insurance with, that sounds exactly what I'm looking for, although i'd probably rather have room for a little more bike as when i totalled up my 5 bikes they came to around 3.5K to replace. :shock:
  • jayson
    jayson Posts: 4,606
    Those immobilise tags are not worth nothing, i had my loster tagged by the police with one and it dint help at all when it was nicked, i never saw it again and the police havent been able to find it either.

    I would save ur money and time and get the biggest heftiest lock money can buy and then pray the theiving scumbags havent got a means of getting through it, although experience has taught me that if they're determined enough nothing at all will stop em im afraid.
  • supersonic
    supersonic Posts: 82,708
    Coming soon...

    The Sonic Bike Satellite Tracking System ;-)
  • I would save ur money and time and get the biggest heftiest lock money can buy and then pray the theiving scumbags havent got a means of getting through it, although experience has taught me that if they're determined enough nothing at all will stop em im afraid.

    i think having a tag still a good idea but from my point fo view i would not be leaving my bike alone as i would ride it then when i not riding it be inside my house, so getting a big lock would serve no purpose for me.

    the UV stamp i belive most local police can do for you for a small charge, i going down there once my bike arives via deliv to get it stamped so il post the details of cost ect, but i belive they take your information and then stamp a UV marker with the important stuff on the frame somewhere.

    best bet is to ask your local police HQ what services they provide, as it depends where you live, im london so there plenty of pikies around where if you like out in country i dout the local sheep going to nick much:)
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
    http://www.justgiving.com/broxbourne-runners
  • papasmurf.
    papasmurf. Posts: 2,382
    Datatagging only of any use if the police recover the bike...which is pretty rare. Make sure you don't lose it in the first place.. and you'll be surprised how many people have had bikes nicked out of their houses..just the bikes, which means they've been scoped before hand.. I'd always lock the bikes at home and keep them so they can't be seen from the outside and any tools that could be used to break the locks aren't kept in that room either..