Stuck seatpost

doyler78
doyler78 Posts: 1,951
edited January 2009 in Workshop
I wanted to lower my seatpost down a couple mm but will it move - you must be joking. Can twist it from side to side with a huge amount of force but or down it will not move.

I've sprayed both WD40 and GT85 on it but it doesn't seem to have made any difference. I've taken the collar off completely also and I've tried hitting it with a mallet and that hasn't budged it either.

It's a titanium frame with a carbon seatpost if that makes any difference now how do I get this thing to move up or down please.

Comments

  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • doyler78
    doyler78 Posts: 1,951
    Thanks Monty Dog for pointing to the obvious. Here's the full link if somebody comes across this again.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html

    Got to love the bit about it being the result of bad installation. Should I send the link to Planet X then :D I've move it up and down plenty but never removed it.

    Will see if I can manage to get it unstuck with his hints
  • ds1964
    ds1964 Posts: 9
    If you haven't tried this - give this a go as t worked for me - remove one of the bottle cage bolts, turn the bike upside down , spray GT85 through the bottle cage hole and leave upside down overnight. I was then able to get the post out only using the saddle to twist.
  • mercsport
    mercsport Posts: 664
    I had the same prob' a couple of weeks ago on my ti frame and carbon post ( I should've known better than leave it a year before thinking about it as my old Record carbon post is still SOLID within my original but broken ti frame .. impossible to shift . In fact - I remember now - I fractured and hazed the carbon in my brutal assault ) .

    At any rate after a couple of days of WD40 saturation it took two weighty thugs - myself and a chum - to extricate the rascal . The trick , of course , was to time the heavy vertical thwacks with the violent twists . Team effort . Also the big screwdriver on the twist to force apart the slot was the deciding factor . Oh , maybe 15 minutes of sweaty , brutal , toil .

    I've been told that ' Carbon grease ' is the thing to use , but where to procure it is the question ? ? ? . Apparently it contains 'micro-grit' , or somesuch , which stops the tendency to weld to the mating metal . My LBS doesn't flog it and they use something without a name out of a pot that's ancient beyond years .
    "Lick My Decals Off, Baby"
  • doyler78
    doyler78 Posts: 1,951
    Unstuck. WD-40 or GT85 didn't do the trick on this occasion. What sorted it was a hairdryer and extreme amount of force of 2 people a la mercsport's suggestion with a lot of twisting and pulling. It was more effort than some of my workouts :lol:

    The steapost was covered in a white powder so I guess that explain some of why it was so hard to remove.

    So how do I now put this seatpost back on again in such a way that I can ensure that it doesn't stick again. Some grease it others say never to use grease on carbon so how I am supposed to know what to do.

    Will be happy to hear your views however I think I will throw this one back to Planet X to see what their view on it is.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    get rid of the white powdery deposits from both seatpost and inside the seat tube. Get hold of some Tacx carbon assembly compound (Google will find it) and use that instead of grease on reassembly. You should find you don't need to tighten it as much to hold the post securely.

    And (you probably plan to do this anyway) loosen and give the thing a wiggle about every six months or so. The seat post that is.
  • doyler78
    doyler78 Posts: 1,951
    keef66 wrote:
    get rid of the white powdery deposits from both seatpost and inside the seat tube. Get hold of some Tacx carbon assembly compound (Google will find it) and use that instead of grease on reassembly. You should find you don't need to tighten it as much to hold the post securely.

    And (you probably plan to do this anyway) loosen and give the thing a wiggle about every six months or so. The seat post that is.

    Stupid question coming up but how do I clean inside the seat tube and what I do I use :oops: Most of the powder was towards the bottom of the seatpost so guessing whereever it seized it was quite far down the seat tube.

    I should say that the bike was only bought at the end of June so we have only gone past the 6 month mark so it looks like it has no problem seizing up so I'll probably need to do it a little more often.

    Will check around for the carbon assembly compound you mentioned. Thanks
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I have no experience with Ti frames, but I generally wrap a bit of rag around a suitably sized length of wood to clean inside my steel frame seat tube before regreasing the alloy post. I imagine a bit of metal polish like Brasso would get it spotless inside if required.
  • mercsport
    mercsport Posts: 664
    For the curious amongst us my search dug up these links - amongst others - in the UK :

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id= ... news/10-25

    http://www.tacx.com/producten.php?langu ... ce%20Tools

    http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=A1637

    I'll be ordering some today .
    "Lick My Decals Off, Baby"
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Ha! Good spot mercsport. I could only previously find it in tubs too large for me to use up before I die. I'll be having one of them there 80g tubes for my carbon seatpost in an alu frame.
  • mercsport
    mercsport Posts: 664
    Now , wouldn't you know it , 'probikekit' is a duff link .

    They illustrate that tantalising 80g tube , at the right price , but don't have it in stock . Damn !

    Ended up paying twelve quid ( inc p&p ) at a place called ' Bikegoo ' .

    Oh well , so long as it does the job . :)
    "Lick My Decals Off, Baby"
  • doyler78
    doyler78 Posts: 1,951
    Planet X has advised that the tacx stuff as mentioned above is the thing to be using however I can't find it in stock anywhere. I can't even find it on bikegoo. There is one site that has it but they take 5-15 days for despatch so that probably means they don't hold stock so will not be buying from there.

    Anybody any ideas where you can actually get this. If this is such an essential item for carbon frame fitting why is so hard to get?

    Thanks for the seatpost cleaning tip - will give a go.
  • mercsport
    mercsport Posts: 664
    doyler78 wrote:
    Planet X has advised that the tacx stuff as mentioned above is the thing to be using however I can't find it in stock anywhere. I can't even find it on bikegoo. There is one site that has it but they take 5-15 days for despatch so that probably means they don't hold stock so will not be buying from there.

    Anybody any ideas where you can actually get this. If this is such an essential item for carbon frame fitting why is so hard to get?

    Thanks for the seatpost cleaning tip - will give a go.

    Sorry about that . I've just been back on Bikegoo and cannot find it either !

    After registering with them I paid by Paypal and have all the email receipts from them for the Tacx stuff . I can only suppose that I got the last tube and they cleared it off the website pronto .

    Give these a try : http://www.langsettcycles.co.uk/product ... 81s41p4127

    There's other stuff I came across in my search this morning , for example by 'Scott' and 'Finish Line' , which I'd suppose to be similar if not identical .

    Good luck .
    "Lick My Decals Off, Baby"
  • doyler78
    doyler78 Posts: 1,951
    Never worry mercsport - it looks like most places have sold out. Langlett has UK mainland only so can't order from there. I have looked for the Scott and have come across this with free UK delivery so I'm hoping this does the same job (looks like it from the blurb).

    http://www.kudubikes.co.uk/shop/13/50/

    It's the last item on the list.
  • If you are buying CF assembly compound, (everyone should have this), a small packet goes a long way, you don't really need a bucket.

    What happened: galvanic corrosion between the carbon fibers and the titanium. Titanium is really bad for galvanic corrosion with most metals.

    Greasing CF posts is ok according to Calfee, but then they may slip, so assembly paste is the way to go. The paste prevents corrosion, and the microscopic styrofoam beads act to "grab" surfaces.

    Assembly paste should be used for any aluminum or CF parts, such as stems, bars, steerers, you will not slip without having to increase torque.