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a dog in a hat

campagchriscampagchris Posts: 773
edited December 2008 in Pro race
This is an excellent book well worth reading,I bought it after reading about it in procycling its on amazon for less than a tenner,great to put on your christmas list.

Posts

  • aarwaarw Posts: 448
    yeah, it's on the list. just started Bad Blood.
  • Just finished Bad Blood and From Lance to Landis. I have gone through so many bike books in the past 6 months that I think I am running out of reading material :)
  • iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,784
    Dog in a Hat is one of the best cycling books I've read in ages.

    Refreshing that it's not about big races and big names. The author was interviewed on Podium Cafe recently and that was pretty interesting.
    Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.
  • also just finished bad blood and passed it onto my boss. great read. also read life and death of marco pantani (v sad) and from lance to landis.

    think il get this book your recommending, need some motivation as the cold months draw in!!
  • I am hoping (hint hint) that Santa delivers the Alpe D'Huez book for me
  • vermootenvermooten Posts: 2,697
    Currently reading Bradley Wiggins' book. Am halfway through, waiting for the good bit. Starting to wonder if the good bit will ever come.

    I loved the Johan Bruyneel book! The last chapter is mmmmm. Personally I don't xcare too much about his alleged methods, so am immune from hating him. Good that the book was ghost written, made it worth reading.

    I didn;'t think that Bad Blood was all that - it didn't tell me what I didn't already know. The Michael Hutchinson book is great, so is Lance to Landis although I keep wanting to email David walsh the message "Get a life, David" - though his evidence seems pretty sound.

    Best one recently was Les Woodland's book about the history of the Tour.

    Jeez I'm pompous tonight...
    You just have to ride like you never have to breathe again.

    Manchester Wheelers
  • Luckily I was bought the Campagnolo book recently.

    It's a good read, with some interesting technical bits, but most of all there's some great photography of old Campag kit.

    Unfortunately, if you like putting fishing tackle on your bikes, it won't be of interest :wink:

    Dog in a Hat is next on my reading list.
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

    http://vineristi.wordpress.com - the blog for Viner owners and lovers!
  • aarwaarw Posts: 448
    funny you say that about the wiggens book. I wasn't overly drawn in by it either. also just finished the Hoy book, an enjoyable enough read, but i couldn't tell you what was good about it. i think it was just well written.
  • iain_jiain_j Posts: 1,941
    Having a quick look on my shelf...

    The Death Of Marco Pantani - a sad story but a fascinating insight to the drugs problem

    Kings of the Mountains - also by Matt Rendell, fascinating again but I struggled to follow it at times (diverges from cycling a lot) - will try it again sometime.

    Michael Hutchinson - The Hour - a funny guy but with real frustrations.

    The Flying Scotsman - wow :shock:

    Tim Mulliner - Long Ride For A Pie - he "rides home" from London to New Zealand cos he's homesick, and made a drunken bet with his mates that he'd go on his bike. One of those that I couldn't put down, and whenever I did, I wanted to go for a ride.

    Just started reading Chris Hoy's book, going well so far. Bought Bradley Wiggins' at the weekend and spent about half an hour in the shop flicking it open at any page and reading bits. Can't wait to start it.
  • vermootenvermooten Posts: 2,697
    iain_j wrote:
    The Flying Scotsman - wow :shock:
    +1

    I wonder why I forgot this, possibly my favourite cycling book.
    You just have to ride like you never have to breathe again.

    Manchester Wheelers
  • Agree, Dog in a Hat is one of the best cycling books I've read. Bad Blood is also very good. Don't bother with "We might as well win" - awful. The Hour by Hutch is also very well written and an amusing read
  • JC.152JC.152 Posts: 645
    for some reason i was thinking that there would be a real dog in a hat but still Flying Scotsman is good, shows how complicated Obree's life was more than the film does even though I read it after watching the film

    [img][/img]pb230096ni9.th.jpgthpix.gif
  • HarpHarp Posts: 79
    Bit of useless information , the title comes from a Belgian saying. When they see something out of place, they say it's like seeing a dog wearing a hat
  • iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,784
    Harp wrote:
    Bit of useless information , the title comes from a Belgian saying. When they see something out of place, they say it's like seeing a dog wearing a hat

    For example and American in Belgium racing bikes in the 80's :)
    Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.
  • I had a newsletter today from mousehold press saying Vin Denson's book "the full cycle" will be out on the 10th of december.


    http://www.wordofsport.com/books/187473 ... full_cycle

    they have some nice cycling books :wink:
  • robjhprobjhp Posts: 21
    Just read A dog in a Hat thought it was a really good book.If your a fan of the Ronde&Roubaix you'll love it.Also recomend The escape artist by Mat Seaton&my all time favourite The Rider by Tim Krabbe
  • I had a newsletter today from mousehold press saying Vin Denson's book "the full cycle" will be out on the 10th of december.

    http://www.wordofsport.com/books/187473 ... full_cycle

    they have some nice cycling books :wink:
    Of which this is one of the very best. Recommended!

    In Pursuit of Stardom - Les Nomades du Velo Anglais

    For much of cycling’s “Fabulous Fifties” it was Brian Robinson alone who flew the flag for Britain abroad – that is until three young men, lodging in a converted ex-WD ambulance, set out to emulate his success, starting from ground zero. Variously mistaken for gypsies, terrorists, undertakers, even market traders, and going under the French nickname of “the three battling Brits”, Jock Andrews, Vic Sutton and Tony Hewson, overcame handicap, prejudice, disappointment and hardship to touch the heights of the sport. These are our original cash-starved, have-a-go pioneers, whose inspiration prompted Tom Simpson and succeeding generations of would-be stars to cross the Channel.

    Tony Hewson’s frequently comic and moving memoir recalls professional cycling’s Golden Age, telling of those four tumultuous years of struggle to earn a living and the respect of the continental peloton.


    http://www.mousehold-press.co.uk/detail_stardom.html
  • yakkyakk Posts: 589
    Agreed, Aurelio, cracking read, heavily recommended.
    Yak
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  • iain_jiain_j Posts: 1,941
    It's my dad's birthday next month (hope he's not reading this!) and I bought him Geoff Thomas's book, Riding Through The Storm. Started flicking through it last night before i wrapped it up. Two hours later, at midnight, i thought i'd better put it down and go to bed now. Went out and bought another copy today and it's at the top of my reading pile now.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,678
    Two great books -

    The rider by Tim Krabbe (Fictional but bloody ace!)

    In search of Robert Millar - Written by Richard Moore who did the Heroes, Villains and Velodromes and is working, I am very reliably informed, on Chris Hoy's autobiography.
  • Does the Robert Millar book come under fiction or non fiction in the library :roll:
  • Does the Robert Millar book come under fiction or non fiction in the library :roll:

    Hi there.

    Strange biography that one. I came away form it knowing more about Millar, but liking him less... Apologies if you are listening gtts!

    Cheers, Andy
  • Does the Robert Millar book come under fiction or non fiction in the library :roll:

    Hi there.

    Strange biography that one. I came away form it knowing more about Millar, but liking him less... Apologies if you are listening gtts!

    Cheers, Andy

    Knowing more :?: ............hmmm :?
    In reality you came away liking Moore's version less .
  • This is exactly why I haven't bought the book nor borrowed it from the library.The author had said he never met Robert.It makes me wonder if any of Robert's close friends or family actually talked to the author either.If there was no input from Robert how can it be a good book :roll: or infact be true hence it should be under fiction.
    The same goes for C.W.s exclusive interview how could they say they had an exclusive when they later admit its through a 3rd parties email messages.How do they know the person they had messages from 2nd hand was Robert :shock: Why haven't they had a follow up interview.
    It amazes me how the press treat our greatest riders.These riders have earned our respect and there wish to have a private life.
    Robert I hope this book nor the c.w. exclusive has caused you pain and that you can live in peace,you have earned it.
    you sir are a legend in my eyes and Im sure Im not alone.
  • Does the Robert Millar book come under fiction or non fiction in the library :roll:

    Hi there.

    Strange biography that one. I came away form it knowing more about Millar, but liking him less... Apologies if you are listening gtts!

    Cheers, Andy

    Knowing more :?: ............hmmm :?
    In reality you came away liking Moore's version less .

    Fair enough.
  • Dave_1Dave_1 Posts: 9,512
    let's hope gottheteeshirt puts his racing career in his own words one day...must be some pretty interesting insights and a truck load of cash to be made :D 8)
  • weyayemanweyayeman Posts: 1,141
    I will 2nd that.I'd love to read Robert's own biography,if its as good as his bike reports it will be a belter.
    I too am amazed at the way our top sportsmen and women are treat yet Eddie the Eagle has cult hero status makes you wonder.
    How son yee divent need gaan doon the Pit,coz thas plenty coal in the coal hoose
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