Forum home Commuter cycling forum The workshop

Wrench?

markybhoy67markybhoy67 Posts: 346
edited October 2008 in The workshop
Right at the moment I have an attachment that I carry in the saddle bag the loosens the nuts on the back wheel.

What I need is a proper tool for keeping in my shed that will do the same job as the carry one seems to be getting all chewed up so I want to keep this in good nick for out on the road.

My question is :oops: what size of wrench attachment do I need and also does anyone have a link to a cheap clicky wrench type thingmy

I hope the above question makes sense as I am no sure of the correct name for the tool that I am looking for :?

Thanks

Posts

  • Would one of these be ok as an alternative?

    http://www.screwfix.com/prods/84398/Aut ... Wrench-14#

    Is there a standard size for a bike wheel nut or is there a way of measuring them?
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    Take you're bike into the LBS, find out which spanner fits, purchase a suitable one for home work...
  • gandhigandhi Posts: 187
    Aren't they normally 15mm (so your suggestion would be to big)?

    That's what I have on my fixed. I have a small spanner that lives in my bike bag, but I often just use a pedal wrench in the garage.

    Edit:
    Just measure between 2 opposite flat surfaces on your wrench.
  • BikerbaboonBikerbaboon Posts: 1,017
    if you want to go posh would get torque wrench and a soccet set ( also can get allen key sets) helps no end with general tinkering.
    Nothing in life can not be improved with either monkeys, pirates or ninjas
    456
  • Thanks guys for the replies.

    I thought of a clicky wrench as you can use this one handed. I have hydraulic disc brakes and find it a bit difficult at times trying to get the wheel aligned properly when putting the bike back together due to not having enough hands :D

    Not too bothered about anything fancy, just something that does the job one handed :lol:

    Too make things easier I have ordered a Park PCS10 work stand so hopefully this helps as I wont have to rest the frame between my knees.

    I just like to make things as easy as possible.

    Cheers for the 15mm tip, I will start my search now :D
  • JameyJamey Posts: 2,152
    I've just bought a workstand too but I must admit that I still find it easier to put wheels (particularly rear wheels) back into the frame with the bike upside down.

    However I don't have disc brakes, although I suspect that if I did it would just be one more reason for me to turn the bike over.
  • Jamey wrote:
    I've just bought a workstand too but I must admit that I still find it easier to put wheels (particularly rear wheels) back into the frame with the bike upside down.

    However I don't have disc brakes, although I suspect that if I did it would just be one more reason for me to turn the bike over.

    Hi Jamey, I can't turn my bike upside down (something to do with air getting into the hydraulic brakes)

    It is a complete pain trying to put the rear wheel back on, I would have thought that a work stand would have helped as it least I wouldn't have to try and balance the frame leaving both hands for concentrating on the wheel.

    Oh well just have to see what happens when I get the stand.

    Cheers anyway
  • JameyJamey Posts: 2,152
    Oh yeah, don't get me wrong, a workstand is definitely easier than trying to do it with the bike the right way up. Didn't realise that upending it wasn't an option with hydraulic brakes, apologies.
  • Jamey wrote:
    Oh yeah, don't get me wrong, a workstand is definitely easier than trying to do it with the bike the right way up. Didn't realise that upending it wasn't an option with hydraulic brakes, apologies.

    No problem Jamey, sorry I should have mentioned the hydraulic brakes in my original post.

    I got my work stand today and have now used it for the first time

    Hallelujah

    What a difference it makes for working on the bike, I am going to strip the bike down at the weekend to give it a good wash so will see what it is like for putting the wheels back on.
  • feelfeel Posts: 800
    Sounds like you need a spanner set like maybe one of the top TWO or if you fancy something a bit quicker and flasher you could go further down the page to the ratchet spanners.
    We are born with the dead:
    See, they return, and bring us with them.
  • andrewjosephandrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    you can turn a bike with hydraulic brakes upside down with no danger. you may cause problems if you pull on the levers whilst upside down.

    All mountainbikers I know turn their bikes upside down to work on them all the time, i.e. fixing a puncture. I do it myself all the time.
    --
    Burls Ti Tourer for Tarmac, Saracen aluminium full suss for trails
  • you can turn a bike with hydraulic brakes upside down with no danger. you may cause problems if you pull on the levers whilst upside down.

    All mountainbikers I know turn their bikes upside down to work on them all the time, i.e. fixing a puncture. I do it myself all the time.

    Hi andrewjoseph, what you say is different from the ridgeback manual

    Do not turn a bike fitted with Hydraulic brakes upside down
    for any reason, as air held in the lever reservoir
    can enter the hydraulic lines, causing a soft feel at
    the lever and ineffective braking.

    Not that I am disagreeing with what you say

    It's just that I have no knowledge of disc brakes (or anything to do with bikes for that matter) at all so I was just going with what ridgeback says.

    Thanks for the tip all the same as I suspect that there are times when you just have to have a bike upside down :lol:

    Thanks
  • Big Red SBig Red S Posts: 26,890
    Jamey wrote:
    I've just bought a workstand too but I must admit that I still find it easier to put wheels (particularly rear wheels) back into the frame with the bike upside down.
    Putting them back in in the workstand gets easier with practice. Much easier with QRs than nuts, though.
    you can turn a bike with hydraulic brakes upside down with no danger. you may cause problems if you pull on the levers whilst upside down.

    All mountainbikers I know turn their bikes upside down to work on them all the time, i.e. fixing a puncture. I do it myself all the time.

    Hi andrewjoseph, what you say is different from the ridgeback manual

    Do not turn a bike fitted with Hydraulic brakes upside down
    for any reason, as air held in the lever reservoir
    can enter the hydraulic lines, causing a soft feel at
    the lever and ineffective braking.
    This is inaccuracy in an attempt to not be misinterpreted.
    If there is air in the reservoir on the lever, they're entirely correct in saying that if you tip the bike upside down it's likely to find itself in the hose. They're also entirely correct to say that when you put the bike the right way up again the brake will probably feel a bit soft when you pull the lever.
    It'll feel a little less soft the next time, and about normal by the third or fourth pull.
    Thanks for the tip all the same as I suspect that there are times when you just have to have a bike upside down :lol:
    Crashing's a common one...
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