Tubular Tyres

mostly harmless
mostly harmless Posts: 162
edited August 2008 in Workshop
Suppose you had a scale of increasing mechanical complexity that went something like this

0 - adjusting gears and brakes
1 - installing gears and brakes
2 - fitting a chain + cassette
3 - installing bottom brackets
4 - pressing a headset
5 - building wheels

Whereabouts in the this scale would gluing tubular tyres come?

Are we talking a 3? or a 6? Or is it easier and has just become shrouded in myth and lore?

Comments

  • shargrea
    shargrea Posts: 126
    I wouldn't say that fitting tubs actually requires more skill than fitting clinchers. It's just that it is messier, takes far longer, and requires the patience not to take short cuts.
    Ensure that new tubs are 'stretched' before gluing by fitting onto a rim (without glue), inflated and left for 24 hours.
    After the final layer of glue is applied, wait for some time for this to dry before actually fitting the tub, or you (and the sidewalls of the tub) will end up covered in glue.
  • snipz
    snipz Posts: 85
    2.5 and use glue not tape!
  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601
    snipz wrote:
    2.5 and use glue not tape!

    2.5 and use tape not glue.
    I agree with "shrouded in myth and lore".

    Dennis Noward
  • synchronicity
    synchronicity Posts: 1,415
    I'd put it at 3.5 with glue.

    Glue is better than tape! :P
  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601

    Glue is better than tape! :P

    Maybe, maybe not, but it 's sure as hell a whole lot easier.

    Dennis Noward
  • I have used tubs for a few years now and always got on OK with them. I have always used tape and I wondered why glue is considered better.

    I got my first puncture for ages on Sunday. It all went terribly wrong & I had to phone for a lift.

    I had a spare tyre - an old one that had been used, then folded up and strapped under my seat. I got the punctured tyre off OK and the new one on, though I noticed there was all sorts of grit and debris attached to the now not very sticky tape, after miles of being strapped under the seat. Biggest problem though was some problem with the valve, and air would not stay in. As I was relying on a CO2 cartridge inflator, this became a major problem.

    Now I wonder if a new (pre-stretched) unglued/taped tyre would be better for a slow ride home.

    Also, has anyone seen a seat bag that is a perfect size & shape for a folded up tub. I don't have a bag for anything else - everything goes in my pockets.

    Final thought - is there a specially designed tubular spare? Something that fold up tightly, and is a little easier to fit, for emergency, get-you-home use only?

    Thanks for any thoughts.

    Milt
    Miltomatic
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    Miltomatic wrote:
    Final thought - is there a specially designed tubular spare? Something that fold up tightly, and is a little easier to fit, for emergency, get-you-home use only?

    A track tub, no puncture protection though - so you have to be careful.
    I like bikes...

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  • Ste_S
    Ste_S Posts: 1,173
    Miltomatic wrote:
    I have used tubs for a few years now and always got on OK with them. I have always used tape and I wondered why glue is considered better.

    I got my first puncture for ages on Sunday. It all went terribly wrong & I had to phone for a lift.

    I had a spare tyre - an old one that had been used, then folded up and strapped under my seat. I got the punctured tyre off OK and the new one on, though I noticed there was all sorts of grit and debris attached to the now not very sticky tape, after miles of being strapped under the seat. Biggest problem though was some problem with the valve, and air would not stay in. As I was relying on a CO2 cartridge inflator, this became a major problem.

    Now I wonder if a new (pre-stretched) unglued/taped tyre would be better for a slow ride home.

    Also, has anyone seen a seat bag that is a perfect size & shape for a folded up tub. I don't have a bag for anything else - everything goes in my pockets.

    Final thought - is there a specially designed tubular spare? Something that fold up tightly, and is a little easier to fit, for emergency, get-you-home use only?

    Thanks for any thoughts.

    Milt

    Stick the tub in a bag and hold it under the saddle rails with toe straps ?

    Tape wins for ease of use for me
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    I'd go for it being a 0 to be honest with tape. Never bothered with glue.

    My tub fits nicely inside my normal saddle pack - a tip is to put the tub inside a plastic sandwich bag - and it slides into the pack much easier than the rubber tread permits.

    They are a lot pricier and in my experience less sturdy than hi pressures though - so I'd only really think they were sensible for racing on.