Forum home Mountain biking forum MTB general

Front end lifting when ascending

gkf9gkf9 Posts: 176
edited July 2008 in MTB general
Hi

Posting this on behalf of a friend, been out riding together and he has been
complaining that when ascending up hills his bike feels like its wanting to lift up off
the ground at the front end.

He has been told by Lbs that if he changes the stem all the geometry will go out and its put
him off going down this route.

Woluld it solve the problem to change the stem for a longer one?

or is there any other way to help the problem of the front lifting apart from shifting his body etc

Thanks for any help or comments

Posts

  • ExeterSimonExeterSimon Posts: 830
    I'd say body position.......but what gear is he ascending in?
    Whyte 905 (2009)
    Trek 1.5 (2009)
    Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp (2007)
  • millstermillster Posts: 209
    Surely anything other than repositioning the position of the saddle will muck up the geo. ie. longer/shorter stem, decreasing fork travel.

    I used to have this problem a bit, and since going clipped in, my weight seems more focused over the bike, and the problem has disappeared!
  • Andy BAndy B Posts: 8,115
    When climbing you need to sit further forward on the saddle, censored right on the nose of the saddle (shifts weight forward & stops front end lifting) & pull the bars towards you (which makes the rear wheel dig in for traction)
    2385861000_d125abe796_m.jpg
  • gkf9gkf9 Posts: 176
    I'd say body position.......but what gear is he ascending in?

    Id say the granny ring at front and the second biggest cog at rear if that makes sense?
  • dave_hilldave_hill Posts: 3,877
    gkf9 wrote:

    Id say the granny ring at front and the second biggest cog at rear if that makes sense?

    Changing the length of his stem will NOT change the geometry of the bike. That's utter censored and whoever told him that should be beaten severely with an old Sachs screw-on freewheel.

    What it WILL do is lengthen the cockpit and put his weight further forward. It MAY help to keep his front wheel down as he climbs but it will also throw his weight further forward when descending which isn't always desirable.

    Shortening the forks WILL change the geometry of the bike, again throwing his weight further forward but it will also steepen the frame, taking his weight off the rear (possibly affecting traction) and sharpening the steering.

    There's no such thing as the "right" gear for climbing - it's down to ability, strength and what the terrain dictates.

    I'd say you mate's problem is down to his technique - he needs to sit forward on the saddle (but not so far forward that he loses traction); keep his upper body low over the bike; keep an inboard grip on the bars (i.e. closer to the controls than the ends of the bars; and keep his elbows tucked in.
    Give a home to a retired Greyhound. Tia Greyhound Rescue
    Help for Heroes
    JayPic
  • I agree with Dave.. I struggle to climb, and i've found that moving more forward in the saddle and tucking my elbows in makes a big difference.

    Tucking the elbows in also helps keep the bike in a straight line, so you'll wander less when climbing.

    The more he climbs the better he'll get, also the fitter and will be more able to use a higher gear, which may help reduce the lift.
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
  • TonyWardTonyWard Posts: 149
    Pull the elbows in and down rather than pulling up on the bars. Made a huge difference to me. Could not believe how hard it was to keep front wheel down when I started but now starting to become second nature.
  • Andy BAndy B Posts: 8,115
    TonyWard wrote:
    Pull the elbows in and down rather than pulling up on the bars.
    Andy_B wrote:
    pull the bars towards you (which makes the rear wheel dig in for traction)
    towards you, not up ;)
    2385861000_d125abe796_m.jpg
  • gs3gs3 Posts: 249
    Little trick to get your elbows in without having to think about it too much - just move your thumbs onto the top of the bar instead of wrapped underneath as normal - your elbows will automatically come in and down and your weight will shift a little forward too! Try it and see!!!


    .
  • FSR_XCFSR_XC Posts: 2,258
    The more you practice your technique the easy it becomes and the better you get!

    It will feel uncomfortable at first but, as has been said, sit as far forward & tuck elbows in.

    It might help to move the saddle forward a little.
    Stumpjumper FSR 09/10 Pro Carbon, Genesis Vapour CX20 ('17)Carbon, Rose Xeon CW3000 '14, Raleigh R50

    http://www.visiontrack.com
  • wordnumbwordnumb Posts: 847
    Spread toffee on the front tyre... nah, elbows in, thumbs on top of bars, body weight forward.
  • BlundellBlundell Posts: 308
    First off make sure as those elbows are tucked in when climbing. Also make sure as censored is on seat
  • Steve_b77Steve_b77 Posts: 1,680
    There is ofcourse always the possibility he's got alot of front end travel as this hasn't been mentioned.

    The more you've got the harder it can be to climb unless you move to the front of the saddle like everyone has said.
  • SplasherSplasher Posts: 1,528
    Fit a Marzocchi fork - his bike'll never feel light at the front again. :wink:
    "Internet Forums - an amazing world where outright falsehoods become cyber-facts with a few witty key taps and a carefully placed emoticon."
Sign In or Register to comment.