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I'll soon know more than nicklouse....

BlackSpurBlackSpur Posts: 4,228
edited June 2008 in MTB general
Perhaps that's an exaggeration!? I've been told if all goes well with me as a Saturday lad in my LBS (2 months so far, nothing broken yet!) there's a possibility of me being put through Cytech!
This is something I would love to do and it would be so useful! Has anyone out there done the Cytech course (I presume it is the basic one)? What exactly does it involve?
"Melancholy is incompatible with bicycling." ~James E. Starrs

Posts

  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    i would say it is deffo an exageration :lol: , from what i can gather you wont learn anything a couple of bike builds wont have taught you, but there is alot to be said for a qualification which proves you know what you already know.
  • BlackSpurBlackSpur Posts: 4,228
    The guy I was talking to about it is now a fully fledged mechanic (having done the course on Saturdays) and has got 9 qualifications out of it, including wheelbuilding. I'm not sure exactly what it would involve so I'll give hima good grilling on Saturday!
    "Melancholy is incompatible with bicycling." ~James E. Starrs
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    wheel building looks like a difficult skill to learn, i often wish i could give it a go but im not sure if i have the patience. :lol:
  • rob colerob cole Posts: 706
    Cytech is a great idea if you are new to bike wrenching as it will give you a solid base to work from, and its always really good to get a professional qualification

    the problem with working for a small LBS, is that they often can't afford it (for older staff as under 25s get it paid for by the government) and they can't have their staff taking time off as it leaves the workshop unattended

    I have no formal training, but can do everything apart from servicing rear shocks....learnt everything "on the job" over the years including wheel building, fork servicing, hydraulic brake servicing and working on a wide range of bikes - from bmx and road to cyclocross and mtb

    alot of working professionally as a mechanic is being quick, efficient and thorough, which comes from experience, and also being innovative to solve problems, and having the knowledge to tackle anything that comes through your doors....

    I would love to do the Cytech qualificiation but its too expensive and i don't have enough time off work....
    check out my riding - www.robcole.co.uk Banshee Factory Team rider, Da Kine UK Team rider, www.freeborn.co.uk www.eshershore.com
  • Jimbob_no5Jimbob_no5 Posts: 1,568
    how much is cytech course to do? was suposed to be sent on one with a mate from work but the boss says we cant do it now :( only one full time qualified mechanic and us that know as much but not qualified
    Pinkbike

    I believe in only 2 things in life.
    1) Drink is not my friend
    2) D-Locking cnuts ;)
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    kona_cowan_rider
    have a look in the tech links sticky there is info there and contact numbers etc....
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • Jimbob_no5Jimbob_no5 Posts: 1,568
    cheers nick
    Pinkbike

    I believe in only 2 things in life.
    1) Drink is not my friend
    2) D-Locking cnuts ;)
  • MontanaGMTMontanaGMT Posts: 36
    There was talk of this course where I used to work a while back. The advantages of having this on your CV wasnt great coz I worked on low-medium end casual bikes.
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    It is only the higher cytechs that are any good really - some good courses. The basic one is very simple, and I think most of us would breeze that. A level one cytech unfortunately isnt a mark of a good mechanic, though it is a start and it is good these are now being recognised. However I'd still go on experience if booking a bike in. Some of the very best mechanics don't have any Qs at all!
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