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ceramic rotors for bicycles?

dunkerdunker Posts: 1,503
edited May 2008 in MTB workshop & tech
just wondering if these exist for bikes, you see them on high end cars so would a bicycle benefit from these? better stopping power? ligher?

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  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    hmm. I believe, possibly incorrectly, that ceramic brakes for cars only work at very very very high temperatures, so they may be unsuitable for MTBs.

    However, there was a trend a few years ago in the days of rim brakes, of having ceramic coated rims, but I think that was aimed primarily at preventing your rims from wearing out.
  • Andy BAndy B Posts: 8,115
    Yup, ceramic rotors only work properly once up to temperature, so no use for MTB's
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  • dunkerdunker Posts: 1,503
    ahh right, that's me learned cheers :)
  • F1 etc use carbon rotors, which only worth at high temperatures and wear very quickly , and can explode when they get too thin.

    Some road cars use carbon/ceramic compounds which work OK when cool but better when hot. They last longer but considering it was a £20k option on the top porsches at one point I dont see them happening on (push)bikes not is there likelty a reason to bother.
  • mtb.boymtb.boy Posts: 208
    There are some carbon disc brakes for bikes. They were in a WMTB a few months back. But they were something like £800 each (But only weighed about 25g each).
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  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    Rob, I think the carbon brakes used in racing are intended to solve the overheating problem - in that they can get much hotter before disintegrating. That allows a lighter weight of brake, and less convoluted cooling, which leads to higher general performance of the car. Again, I may be wrong.
  • Rob, I think the carbon brakes used in racing are intended to solve the overheating problem - in that they can get much hotter before disintegrating. That allows a lighter weight of brake, and less convoluted cooling, which leads to higher general performance of the car. Again, I may be wrong.

    No your right. Therre to cope with the heat, repeted heavy from 200mph or so for 200 laps will do that:) They also dont work at low temps, neither do the tyres realy, whole car is setup to run at race speed (even the engine cooling).

    I cant imagine coping with heat built up to that extent is needed on bikes - considering a lot of high performance cars cope fine with steel brakes - carbon/ceramic has only been 'standard' on a very few very high top end recent cars.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    the ceramic brakes work from about 700 deg C.
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  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    did anyone see the Top Gear episode where the hamster drives an F1 car?

    He was driving fairly fast, then they told him that the next step was to go MUCH faster.
    If he only went a little bit faster, his tyres still wouldn't be warm enough, and his brakes would be too cold, so he'd crash :shock:
    strange!
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    nicklouse wrote:
    the ceramic brakes work from about 700 deg C.
    Is that all? well, in that case they'd be fine on my bike, because I'm fat, and I AM TEH SLOPESTYLZORZ :lol:
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