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fixing human powered vehicles, tools, couplings, breakages

steppebysteppesteppebysteppe Posts: 6
edited May 2008 in MTB workshop & tech
Hi my new bike is finally finished yay!! You can see pics of it at www.steppebysteppe.com.au however i do have a few queries about it in regards to mantainence of it. Does anyone know of any portable (light and compact) welders for chromoly frames? As we are taking it on a very long and remote cycle tour, and in the event of something going wrong it would be nice to be able to fix it! I know the chances of snapping our tubing are slim, but was just wondering what options are out there for frame repair (maybe even coupling of some variety??) like welding etc. We will be carrying everything with us so weight and size will be the main issue.

thanks

follow our adventures at www.steppebysteppe.com.au

Posts

  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    have a look for a portable brazing kit. will not be that light but will be the lightest option if you insist on taking something to repair the frame.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • edzioedzio Posts: 50
    with your quike, what are you going to do if it gets in to narrow singletrack?
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    now that i can see your webby, why flash only?

    Oh dear me. you are going to get traction problems when the trails are not fairly flat. i would have had a single front wheel. Ok most of the weight is at the rear but still the old 3 legged stool principle is good and it would take away having to work out the Ackerman angle....

    i also hope you are about the same strength as it seems that you have two separate drive systems? this could means that you will be having to steer against the stronger drive all the time. Just my first thoughts from afar.

    i wish you lots of luck.

    Ps what is the head angle and the wheelbase?
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • LarokLarok Posts: 577
    Good luck. Can I convince you to change your mind and get a tandem or even better two bikes? There would no shame on changing your mind, the trip your planning is an awesome one - what a challenge and experience.

    Have you tried your quad on rocky terrain with narrow trails?
  • The suspension allows us to keep traction most of the time by compressing the more elevated fork until all wheels are on the ground, and with the independent drive trains it doesnt matter if the other person pedals at a different output to you as its a freewheeling hub (like how your front wheel just coasts on a normal 2 wheeler) thus there is no steering or traction difficulties(doesnt seem to be yet....) with it. Taken it on numerous single track and mountain bike courses and it seems to handle well (got good stability since its cant tip!) and its actually not much wider than a normal touring bike loaded up with panniers (from memory top tube to tope tube is around 720mm). We purposely left the head angle alot steeper than normal for greater strength and smaller turning circle, and kept a longer wheel base for lower centre of gravity, i'll measure her up later if your all interested :)

    keep the comments flowing, i love the constructive criticism, as every little bit helps in planning this adventure!

    thanks guys (and gals)


    -roger
  • LarokLarok Posts: 577
    edited May 2008
    Can't help thinking your underestimating the terrain you'll be riding out in Mongolia etc. The shots of your machine being used are all on man made bike trails that a family might ride out on. But then maybe you'll be sticking to roads and I'm thinking of the epic cross country rides written about in magazines etc.

    Either way, good luck. Have a great time.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    and with the independent drive trains it doesnt matter if the other person pedals at a different output to you as its a freewheeling hub (like how your front wheel just coasts on a normal 2 wheeler) thus there is no steering or traction difficulties(doesnt seem to be yet....) with it.

    you can have issues. you will be able to steer the craft by putting more force into one side unless you counter it by steering input.
    it is a common steerering device on many things. i used to race buggys that were powered by two motors one to each wheel and that did everything power steering etc....

    i would have thought 2 freewheeling cranks and two freewheels on the drive hubs. then one person can power both wheels and the inner wheel will run free on corners (differental)

    here is me thinking fully loaded wagon stuck in the mud. one pedaling in low and one pushing with both wheels powered....

    these are just ideas i am seeing and i have no ideas what you have allready been through.

    i also see the befits of having two separate systems. i guess two props?
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • Yeh we still have a lot of testing to do before the trip, so i'm sure there will be lots of changes to the bike. We're trying to break everything possible and put it through the works, so it will definately be a learning experience for us. Test test test test test, and when we find a flaw fix it, then retest etc :) thanks for the advice though, as i bet alot of it will be bloody useful, as yeh this bike is in its very early phase, so lots of changes/improvements to be made to it :)


    in mongolia we are sticking to the steppes mainly, big open grassy/hilly plains, where u just ride and ride....

    we found cornering we only really need to break on the inner wheels, but anyway at the speeds we'll be going fully loaded up, i dont know how much we will need to counter steer.


    but yeh as i said thanks for the tips, and i'll certaintly try them out, as we want this beast the best it can be! :)

    thanks again
  • shin0rshin0r Posts: 555
    I've got no advice to give, but good luck, it looks like a bloody hard trip.
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