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Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 16:37 pm
by HughGabriel
Great video thanks.
MiniG is 2.5 and now has the saddle on his balance bike at its highest, so we need to go bike shopping for him before long.
Then TinyG (14months) can have the balance bike in due course when shes a bit older!

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Fri Aug 31, 2018 10:20 am
by MrSweary
sisleybarnes1 wrote:
SecretSam wrote:So - any tips? our two (twins) are 4 and a half, and have bikes (12" wheels, need something bigger really) and we're trying to teach them to ride without stabilisers. We have 'handles' for the bikes that enable us to hold them upright while they practice, but wanted to know if anyone has some top tips on how to get them up and running.

Thanks in advance.

The best way is to hold bike, not a child. Just hold it from the back, so kids won't see you and have the whole feeling of riding. Then try to let it go for some secs. You will need to run a lot, but it worth the result.


I'm not sure this is true because holding the bike doesn't give them the feeling of riding. If you hold the bike you aren't teaching them to balance themselves. The best way I've seen (and used) is to hold them gently under the armpits per the video linked by marmac. It teaches them how the bike feels without stabilisers and how to balance themselves.

Daughter was riding a pedal bike (aged 3.5) within 10 minutes using this method - all she had to learn was pedalling. True she was already proficient on a balance bike having had a toddle bike from when she was 2.

So, top tips - If they're young enough get them on a balance bike as soon as possible. Avoid stabilisers like the plague. If you're already on stabilisers try using the method in the video. It really does work. Once they realise they can balance they won't look back and you get to watch them disappearing off into the distance (which is another kind of worry altogether).

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 13:48 pm
by Matt_N
HughGabriel wrote:Great video thanks.
MiniG is 2.5 and now has the saddle on his balance bike at its highest, so we need to go bike shopping for him before long.
Then TinyG (14months) can have the balance bike in due course when shes a bit older!
.

We switched from a Hotwalk to a Frog43 just after my lad turned 3, similar to you as he'd hit the limit on the BB and we could see his confidence was there to move up to pedals. He wheeled the Frog out of the shop and was off straight away, so proud seeing such a little person riding like that.

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 13:49 pm
by Matt_N
MrSweary wrote:
sisleybarnes1 wrote:
SecretSam wrote:So - any tips? our two (twins) are 4 and a half, and have bikes (12" wheels, need something bigger really) and we're trying to teach them to ride without stabilisers. We have 'handles' for the bikes that enable us to hold them upright while they practice, but wanted to know if anyone has some top tips on how to get them up and running.

Thanks in advance.

The best way is to hold bike, not a child. Just hold it from the back, so kids won't see you and have the whole feeling of riding. Then try to let it go for some secs. You will need to run a lot, but it worth the result.


I'm not sure this is true because holding the bike doesn't give them the feeling of riding. If you hold the bike you aren't teaching them to balance themselves. The best way I've seen (and used) is to hold them gently under the armpits per the video linked by marmac. It teaches them how the bike feels without stabilisers and how to balance themselves.

Daughter was riding a pedal bike (aged 3.5) within 10 minutes using this method - all she had to learn was pedalling. True she was already proficient on a balance bike having had a toddle bike from when she was 2.

So, top tips - If they're young enough get them on a balance bike as soon as possible. Avoid stabilisers like the plague. If you're already on stabilisers try using the method in the video. It really does work. Once they realise they can balance they won't look back and you get to watch them disappearing off into the distance (which is another kind of worry altogether).


I'd whip the cranks off and get them scooting around on it like a balance bike, it really is the key to early riding.

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 14:15 pm
by MrSweary
Matt_N wrote:I'd whip the cranks off and get them scooting around on it like a balance bike, it really is the key to early riding.


Absolutely, balance is key. Our little one quickly worked out she could go much faster downhill on a balance bike than a scooter. And that was that.

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 00:46 am
by javanman123
Daughter is 6 months, already bought her a balance bike. She can't use it of course but I am very excited for the day she will be able too. looking forward to coming back here for some great advice. cheers

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 15:46 pm
by Slowbike
javanman123 wrote:Daughter is 6 months, already bought her a balance bike. She can't use it of course but I am very excited for the day she will be able too. looking forward to coming back here for some great advice. cheers


Excellent :) Like the thinking.

We bought a BB for our son after coming back from a summer holiday when he saw one and seemed besotted by it.
We staged it so that it was in the sitting room - stood up on blocks (duplo) and I set a camera videoing his entrance - the look on his face was just amazing and I like going back to that video years later (flippin eck - time flies!) He's still using the balance bike as a mess around in the back yard.

Re:

Posted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 16:34 pm
by Adam Rider
fnegroni wrote:Keep the 12 inch bikes.
Take stabilisers off, take that bar you mention off, take pedals off, *if you can* take cranks off too.
Lower the saddle to the lowest comfortable position, so their feet are flat to the floor or just slightly higher.
Then tell them to *scoot*: use their legs to propel forward.



Bump

This is the best way by miles. If you can get the cranks off it will make it safer. Trousers can get caught on loose cranks.

Re: teaching them to ride

Posted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 16:34 pm
by Adam Rider
fnegroni wrote:Keep the 12 inch bikes.
Take stabilisers off, take that bar you mention off, take pedals off, *if you can* take cranks off too.
Lower the saddle to the lowest comfortable position, so their feet are flat to the floor or just slightly higher.
Then tell them to *scoot*: use their legs to propel forward.



Bump

This is the best way by miles. If you can get the cranks off it will make it safer. Trousers can get caught on loose cranks.

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Fri Apr 05, 2019 15:11 pm
by Wolfsbane2k
Going to be spending Saturday trying to get 4 kids off stabilisers.
There are 4 frog bikes in the wings waiting for stabiliser free riders...

Hopefully with 4 egging each other on, we'll get somewhere unlike last time...

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 09:41 am
by Wolfsbane2k
Wolfsbane2k wrote:Going to be spending Saturday trying to get 4 kids off stabilisers.
There are 4 frog bikes in the wings waiting for stabiliser free riders...

Hopefully with 4 egging each other on, we'll get somewhere unlike last time...


2 of 4 now stabiliser free. Thank god for that. Time to get the Frog bikes out.
the other 2 just don't like speed - they cycled 6km each, but at a max speed of about 4mph.. any faster and the brakes slam on - ie just not ready yet .

Still, they all slept well!

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 09:46 am
by Slowbike
well done - I still believe it's much easier (for most) not to do the stabilisers to start with - but there you go ;)
We didn't have the benefit of peer pressure, so had to use incentives instead... hot chocolate was a favourite, stickers were close - but the final straw was promising him a "GPS just like Daddies" - cost me £20 that promise did ... but he realised he could pedal and didn't need to scoot the whole way... ;)

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 10:11 am
by Wolfsbane2k
Slowbike wrote:well done - I still believe it's much easier (for most) not to do the stabilisers to start with - but there you go ;)
We didn't have the benefit of peer pressure, so had to use incentives instead... hot chocolate was a favourite, stickers were close - but the final straw was promising him a "GPS just like Daddies" - cost me £20 that promise did ... but he realised he could pedal and didn't need to scoot the whole way... ;)


Oh aye. By the time I got around to getting lWB1 out on a bike of any sort (he loved scooting everywhere on a low level scooter), he was too big for the balance bikes around, and he was more interested in pedalling and kicked of a massive fuss when I took the pedals off to use it as a balance bike, (and the ability to go a lot faster worked very well for us actually getting places , so we just accepted it.

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 10:27 am
by Slowbike
We're just fortunate to live in a very quiet road and the neighbours have got used to seeing Little Slowbike out on his bike - day/night. We were lucky in getting him interested from before the age of 1 ! Took a couple of years to progress to pedaling though ;)

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 13:01 pm
by Wolfsbane2k
Slowbike wrote:We're just fortunate to live in a very quiet road and the neighbours have got used to seeing Little Slowbike out on his bike - day/night. We were lucky in getting him interested from before the age of 1 ! Took a couple of years to progress to pedaling though ;)


My biggest issue with getting mine stabiliser free has been my own time - I generally only manage to get home just in time for bedtime, and then at weekends its' all about other jobs
The road I live on is generally low traffic (1-2 cars every 10 minutes), but some people really speed on it.

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 13:12 pm
by Slowbike
Wolfsbane2k wrote:
Slowbike wrote:We're just fortunate to live in a very quiet road and the neighbours have got used to seeing Little Slowbike out on his bike - day/night. We were lucky in getting him interested from before the age of 1 ! Took a couple of years to progress to pedaling though ;)


My biggest issue with getting mine stabiliser free has been my own time - I generally only manage to get home just in time for bedtime, and then at weekends its' all about other jobs
The road I live on is generally low traffic (1-2 cars every 10 minutes), but some people really speed on it.


yup - time is critical - if anyone can do it and the child doesn't have peers to play with - then I can really advocate getting a kids bike and scooting around with them - using it like a balance bike - we're fortunate enough to have a suitable place just outside - plenty of warning if there are cars approaching. Finding time is tricky, but I'm so glad we did - even if it hasn't made a difference to the type of rider he'll become - we had fun and I'll always remember that.

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Wed Apr 10, 2019 21:38 pm
by Shirley Basso
Thisll speed them up:

Image

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Sat Apr 27, 2019 09:07 am
by DrHaggis
This teaching them to ride is not like I was expecting at all! I got a beat up Islabike Cnoc 14 for Tiny Haggis (4 y.o., 42 cm inseam). We then went to a park and, after seeing him a bit confused, removed the pedals so he could compare the feeling of the bike with his Decathlon balance bike. After literally 50 meters of scooting, the pedals went back in, and Tiny Haggis became one of us!

It was so easy and natural for him, I don't even think he considers it special. Now I only need to train him to start properly, and to avoid breaking with his shoes.

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 07:39 am
by Tangled Metal
Our kid is now 6 so been riding for something like two and a half years. He never truly got the bb down. He walked on it rather than scooted.

So we tried to get him to ride a proper bike a bit early. He knew he wasn't ready so stabilisers until we started with the positives about riding a bike without stabilisers. Talk about summer tour and all the fun things. So we started without the stabilisers and with the pedals. We knew the bb principle never worked with him.

Anyway early spring he didn't like it. Two weeks later he asked to learn out of the blue. A week later a tarmac slope and he got it within 5 minutes. Day later he was riding along the front near us. That summer he did 15+ miles per day on his bike both solo and attached via a FollowMe Tandem. Year later that on his own with a set of two panniers!

Started school, did cycling lessons. Spent them doing stunts. Yr 1 he's winning all the cycling races. This year we're planning on joining a local kids cycling group. There really is no stopping them once they decide it's time to learn and then they get the bug. It's freedom. They're the captain of their own vessel!

Whatever technique you use, go in for it 100% bit listen to your kid. They know it's time better than you. You do have to bring them with you on this journey or you might not get a cyclist out of the process.

Sorry for the ramblings of a proud dad of a cyclist!

Re: Teaching them to ride

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 07:47 am
by Slowbike
We went on a bit of a ride yesterday - with an afternoon tea shop stop ... (what else!) - saw a couple with bags on their bikes - asked them if they'd come far - or going far - they were down from London on their way to portsmouth, then off to Spain for a 2 week ride ... sparked Little Slowbikes interest and we may be off for a cycle tour this summer ... :)
Oh - and having watched me pre-set his gears - he's now stopping to change his gears before setting off again (doesn't matter that it's deraillieur gears - we'll worry about changing on the move when he's a bit older!)