New machines required

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brasso
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New machines required

Postby brasso » Sun Jul 08, 2007 12:17 pm

Previously done a lot of road riding and I love my old Allez Sport, but I'm looking to get into MTB nothing really serious to start with. There are some reasonable local trails with a few lumps and bumps but nothing that I'm going to kill myself with and I'd like to get out with the missus (she's new to cycling) on local tow paths/ disused railways we have around here. I've got a budget of about £300-£600 for my machine and £250-300 for hers as we don't want to spend too much if she doesn't get on with it.

For her I've been recommended the GT Aggressor Ladies 2007, Iron Horse Maverick 1.0 2007, make and colour aren't important to her but I want to get her a the best machine I can for the money.

For me I've been recommended the Carrera Fury, Specialized Hardrock Pro Disc 2007 ,& Iron Horse Maverick 2.0 2007.

One freind said get a full sus bike but reading up I seem to be pointed towards a hard tail. And are discs really worth the extra cost? Any advice would be great. Thx. :D

hunter145
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Postby hunter145 » Sun Jul 08, 2007 15:33 pm

Disc's are good because that give consistent braking performance in wet and muddy conditions whereas V's would not be as good in winter conditions, however if you are one of those people who only rides in the summer that V's would be find and the rest of the components on the bike would probebly better.

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Big Red S
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Postby Big Red S » Sun Jul 08, 2007 15:51 pm

Discs are well worth it if you get half decent ones, otherwise their only benefit over a mediocre set of v-brakes is that it's easy to upgrade to nice discs. In general, a bike worth buying with disc brakes will be above about £500.
Full sus is, also, often done badly on cheap bikes. If the bike is less than about £800 and full suspension, chances are it's not up to much.

You would easily want the Specialized Rockhopper over the Hardrock Pro Disc. The Hardrock frame is overly heavy for what an awful lot of people would use it for, whereas the Rockhopper's frame is actually really rather nice. It's also ready to just bolt discs onto if you do decide to upgrade.

If you're likely to stick with MtB, i'd definitely reccomend something between £500 and £600. Much less and you'll find them sluggish and unispiring off road - In general, most MtBs under about £400 are designed for beginners to riding, so give a very upright position. Over about £450-£500 this tends to move to a more trail-friendly flatter position.

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brasso
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Postby brasso » Sun Jul 08, 2007 18:49 pm

Thanks for the advice, Sorry for the long follow up post.

Managed to get out this afternoon between watching TDF. Wife tried a few machines and thinks she’s going to get the Ladies Hardrock Sport as she doesn't want to spend too much as a start. and we can always get her a better machine or upgrade if she gets into it.

I had a look at the hard rock and rock hopper. As I'm likely to ride when ever I get the chance so sounds if disks would be a good idea. I must admit I like the look of the rockhopper disc in black, is the disc version worth the extra £'s at the outset or better to get the standard and upgrade?

The guy in the bike store reckoned I should get a more expensive machine he suggested a rock hopper pro or full sus as it will save me spending loads of money upgrading if I stick with MTB which he seemed to think I would haveing spent a bit of time chatting with him. At the time it didn't seem like he was just trying to get me to spend more money as I wasn't making a decision today but with reflection I wondered if he was just being a "good salesman".

Its another £300 from the Rockhopper disc for either the Pro, FSRxc, GT I-Drive or Treck Fuel EX 5 and £450 to the FSRxc Comp all of which he showed me. I'm stuggling to work out if it would be worth it for the type of riding I’m looking to do now or in the future but I don't want to get a bike and then replace it if I get more into MTB.

I've really enjoyed my Road bike and wonder if I'll get the same buzz from MTB :? I could probably afford the better bikes but I don't want to waste money. I'm not interested if its the latest gadget or technology, I get that all day long at work. I just want a good bike I can have some fun on in the great outdoors.

Advice appreciated :)

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Big Red S
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Postby Big Red S » Sun Jul 08, 2007 18:56 pm

It depends on why you're riding.

If you're riding for sheer fun, a full sus bike will let you ride faster, think less and make more mistakes.
The downside is that if you start on a hardtail you develop a far better riding style, which you can then transfer to full sus later. You develop an instinctive judgement of line - picking the smoothest and safest line over whatever the ground's doing becomes completely natural - and you get in the habit of suspending yourself (which is more efficient than just relying on the bike's suspension).

I would say get a hardtail first. They are fun, easy, lighter and more maintenance free. And you're less likely to leave the missus behind.

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brasso
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Postby brasso » Sun Jul 08, 2007 19:32 pm

Thanks "Big Red S" Thats helped make my mind up I'll get the rock hopper subject to a test ride. I'll post back once we're up and running. :D


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